15 Best Stocks to Buy For Beginners Right Now

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Picking good stocks to invest in right now for your portfolio and investment goals is an important first step toward building wealth in the stock market.

But with thousands of stocks to choose from, it can be overwhelming for a new investor to decide which stocks to buy for their brokerage portfolio. Today’s market uncertainty doesn’t make it any easier, either. But choosing to invest in the stock market will provide you with one of the best and most consistent returns of any investment channel out there.

In this post, you’ll learn about 15 of the best stocks to buy for beginner investors. I’m also going to cover some underlying investment strategies and tips that factor into my selections.

The Best Stocks To Invest In for Beginners in 2021

Here are the 15 best stocks for the beginner investor to buy:

  1. Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN)
  2. Alphabet (NASDAQ: GOOG)
  3. Apple (NASDAQ: AAPL)
  4. Costco (NASDAQ: COST)
  5. Disney (NYSE: DIS)
  6. Facebook (NASDAQ: FB)
  7. Mastercard (NYSE: MA)
  8. Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT)
  9. Netflix (NASDAQ: NFLX)
  10. Nike (NYSE: NKE)
  11. Pinterest (NYSE: PINS)
  12. Shopify (NYSE: SHOP)
  13. Spotify (NYSE: SPOT)
  14. Teladoc (NYSE: TDOC)
  15. Tesla (NASDAQ: TSLA)

Note: This list is in alphabetical order, and doesn’t include things like an ETF (exchange-traded fund), index fund, or mutual fund, which I cover separately.

1. Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN) Amazon logo

  • Price: $3415.06 (as of close Oct 19, 2021)
  • Revenue Growth: 37.76%

Amazon (AMZN) is one of the best-performing stocks of all time, and one of my personal favorites. Not only because I’ve made a ton of money from it, but also because I see the company as very well-positioned for growth in the future. That’s in part because Amazon has so many ways to win: not just taking over more and more areas of online sales, but also through web hosting, subscriptions, or even self-driving cars.

With Amazon’s stock price at $3415.06 (as of close Oct 19, 2021), you may have to purchase fractional shares to get your hands on some. But don’t let that scare you away.

It’s hard to believe, but Amazon’s stock has tripled in value over the past four years. Their annual revenue has more than doubled in that same time period.

It’s impossible to know how high Amazon will go, but I will most certainly be along for the ride.

2. Alphabet (NASDAQ: GOOG) Alphabet, parent company of Google logo

  • Price: $2848.3 (as of close Oct 19, 2021)
  • Revenue Growth: 32.67%

Alphabet is the parent company of search giant Google. The company oversees all products and services related to Google Ads, Android, Chrome, Google Cloud, YouTube, Google Maps, and more. Like Amazon, this company’s got lots of ways to win.

After doing over $183 billion in revenue in 2020, and positioned to exceed $200 billion in revenue in 2021, Alphabet is one of the world’s largest and most profitable companies. In one way or another, their products and services are embedded in nearly every computer and mobile device on the planet.

As of late, Alphabet’s stock price has swung a bit due to market volatility and also regulatory and compliance issues. All that aside, I think Alphabet is a solid buy-and-hold stock for new investors—especially those looking to dabble with fractional shares. Alphabet’s revenue has increased over 60% over the past three years and Alphabet’s stock price (GOOG) has more than doubled in the same time frame.

3. Apple (NASDAQ: AAPL) Apple logo

  • Price: $149.26 (as of close Oct 19, 2021)
  • Revenue Growth: 26.77%

Apple is another top tech stock that consistently reports top-ranking revenue numbers and returns for investors. This makes Apple a solid buy-and-hold choice for beginner investors.

Apple is most famous for inventing the iPhone, iPad, iTunes, AppleTV, iCloud, and Apple Watch. Apple also designs and manufactures a wide range of high-end personal computers, like the Macbook Pro and Macbook Air.

After a stock split in the summer of 2020, shares are currently around $140 at the time of this writing. (Stock splits shouldn’t really matter—it’s just cutting the same pie into more pieces, but they can cause investors to get excited and see the stock as more affordable.) If you invested $5,000 in AAPL five years ago, those shares would be worth around $15,000 today. Not too shabby! And with the company rolling out new products regularly, I think Apple shares are going to keep on climbing.

4. Costco Wholesale (NASDAQ: COST) Costco Wholesale logo

  • Price: $469.77 (as of close Oct 20, 2021)
  • Revenue Growth: 17.49%

Whether you’re stocking up on paper towels or buying a new TV, you can find what you need at your local Costco. The company’s stock has also delivered the goods with a steady march upwards over the years. Today, shares are around $440 each, just about the highest they’ve ever reached.

But they’re not showing signs of letting up. At its most recent count, Costco had more than 100 million cardholders, a number that’s been climbing as steadily as its share price. The company could even bump its annual fee by $5 for even more profits to the bottom line and continue to make a push internationally. Costco has recently announced plans to add second locations to China and France and plans to enter the New Zealand market for the first time in 2022.

As a bonus, the company recently increased its dividend—basically, they’re paying you 70 cents each quarter for every share you own!

5. Disney (NYSE: DIS) Disney logo

  • Price: $170.55 (as of close Oct 19, 2021)
  • Revenue Growth: -8.89%

The Walt Disney Company’s holdings stretch far beyond the Magic Kingdom. Under the Disney umbrella, you’ll find ESPN, Fox, Marvel, Lucasfilm (Star Wars), National Geographic, and a wide range of vacation-oriented locations and services located throughout the world.

Suffice it to say that today and into the future, everybody either wants to watch a Disney-backed movie or TV show or visit one of their many theme parks.

In my opinion, their massive reach, and ability to engage consumers all over the world, and of all ages, makes Disney a solid buy-and-hold stock for beginners. Even with a pandemic that forced the shutdown of their amusement parks for the better part of a year, the company still found a way to make its investors happy: the launch of its Disney+ video-on-demand streaming service brought in revenue from more than 116 million subscribers (and counting!) and allowed Disney to use its video library and new content to make it a strong Netflix competitor.

Pick Like A Pro

Where to invest $500 right now

Lots of new investors take chances on long shots instead of buying shares of great companies. I prefer businesses like Amazon, Netflix, and Apple — they’re all on my best stocks for beginners list.

There’s a company that “called” these businesses long before they hit it big. They first recommended Netflix in 2004 at $1.85 per share, Amazon in 2002 at $15.31 per share, and Apple back in the iPod Shuffle era at $4.97 per share. Take a look where they are now.

That company: The Motley Fool.

For people ready to make investing part of their strategy for financial freedom, take a look at The Motley Fool’s flagship investing service, Stock Advisor. They just announced their top 10 “best buys now” across the entire stock market. Whether you’re starting with $100, $500, or more, you should check out the full details.

Click here to learn more

Change Your Life

From $2.26 to Millionaire in 5 Years

Hey, Grant here. I founded Millennial Money after going from $2.26 in my bank account to over a million in just five years.

Over 80% of my net worth was generated from the growth of my stock investments, many of which I made on my phone!

But how do you get started investing? Which brokerage should you use? What account type is best for you? What should you invest in?

Enter your email address now to enroll in a free, 5-day email course: “How to start investing in stocks: A no-bullshit, jargon-free guide”.

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6. Facebook (NASDAQ: FB) Facebook logo

  • Price: $340.78 (as of close Oct 19, 2021)
  • Revenue Growth: 39.43%

Facebook is the social media and advertising giant that was founded by Mark Zuckerberg. The company’s current stock price is around $330, which is more than seven times higher than it was during its IPO in 2012.

The company also owns Instagram and WhatsApp. Together, their products and services have over 3.5 billion active users as of the first quarter of 2021. That means one out of every three people on the planet uses their platforms. Wow!

With numbers like that, it’s easy to see why so many beginning investors are getting on board with Facebook shares. The company’s been in a bit of hot water from governments around the world for some of their business practices, including accusations that it’s a monopoly. But Zuckerberg and team have been through this kind of heat before.

Overall, the company has a massive audience all over the world of engaged users and continues making smart investments (e.g., Oculus virtual reality). Add it all up, and Facebook seems poised to continue marching toward a $1 trillion market cap.

7. Mastercard (NYSE: MA) Mastercard logo

  • Price: $356.77 (as of close Oct 19, 2021)
  • Revenue Growth: 2.56%

Someday, people might use bitcoin for their daily transactions and make Mastercard a company of the past. But that’s not going to happen anytime soon. Despite the buzz around it, bitcoin is light years from matching the payment system offered by Mastercard, which can settle 5,000 transactions per second. Bitcoin transactions take an average of 10 minutes apiece!

And it’s not just swiping your Mastercard at the mall. The company has positioned itself as a critical player in many different types of transactions and is ahead of the curve as we move more toward digital payments. It’s not as big as rival Visa (Visa has 42% of the market, according to the Nilson Report, compared to 25% for Mastercard), but it’s a smaller company with faster revenue growth, and a lot of room to run.

8. Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT) Microsoft logo

  • Price: $307.41 (as of close Oct 20, 2021)
  • Revenue Growth: 17.53%

Microsoft is among the most valuable stocks in the United States, battling for the top spot with Apple and Amazon. At last count, it had slipped into third.

Still, Microsoft is holding strong, providing millions of users with computers, hardware, software, and cloud computing throughout every corner of the globe. In large part, this is due to CEO Satya Nadella’s impressive tenure at the head of the company, where he’s overseen the acquisition of GitHub, heavy investments in Azure, the company’s cloud computing platform, and the release of services like Microsoft Teams.

Despite the global pandemic, Microsoft stock isn’t far off its all-time high at around $288 per share at the time of this writing. Like many smart tech companies, it’s found a way to make itself more valuable to users even during tough times.

Microsoft’s recent performance is proof of the value of buying and holding when it comes to blue-chip stocks. And that’s precisely why I recommend Microsoft as a solid stock to buy for beginners.

9. Netflix (NASDAQ: NFLX) Netflix logo

  • Price: $625.14 (as of close Oct 20, 2021)
  • Revenue Growth: 20.21%

Netflix is the pioneer of streaming video. The company earned just over $25 billion in revenue in 2020, and it recently surpassed 200 million subscribers around the world.

One thing I really like about Netflix is that it still has so much potential to grow its market share. Currently, less than half of Netflix’s subscribers are located in the United States. As highly populated countries like Brazil and India continue to modernize their internet infrastructure, it’s safe to assume that Netflix stands to benefit in the form of tens of millions of additional subscribers.

I also wouldn’t be surprised if one of the other companies on this list—like Apple—decided to buy Netflix one day. Apple is sitting on a ton of cash and hasn’t really come up with a new line of products in a while (unless you count the over-the-ear headphones that’ll set you back more than $500). Maybe Apple decides to use some of that cash to make a splashy acquisition over the next few years? Who knows?

One thing’s for certain: I’m keeping Netflix in my portfolio to capture my slice of that potential upside, just in case.

10. Nike (NYSE: NKE) Nike logo

  • Price: $158.45 (as of close Oct 20, 2021)
  • Revenue Growth: 23.72%

Nike is the largest manufacturer and supplier of athletic shoes and sports equipment in the world. Since 2016, the company has consistently exceeded $30 billion in annual revenue. And, like all of the stocks in this post, the company’s share value continues to rise over time.

Nike is another one of those safe, blue-chip stocks from the leader in its segment. This is purely my own speculation, but as the population continues to grow, so too should Nike’s global reach.

It’s worth noting that most of the companies on this list are tech companies. Any good portfolio should be balanced, so adding a solid retailer like Nike to your portfolio is always a good way to diversify your investments.

11. Pinterest (NYSE: PINS) Pinterest logo

  • Price: $62.68 (as of close Oct 20, 2021)
  • Revenue Growth: 83.55%

Pinterest went public in 2019. The company offers a visually-focused social media platform that gives people a unique way to share and learn about travel experiences, design and decor, art, recipe ideas, and more.

Personally, I think Pinterest is a solid buy, and it could be a bargain right now. While their stock price has been somewhat of a rollercoaster since their IPO, it feels like almost every big tech stock experiences ups and downs in the early years.

It’s seen a bit steadier of a climb recently. As Pinterest figures out additional ways to monetize its platform and grow its user base, don’t be surprised to see its stock growth accelerate.

12. Shopify (NYSE: SHOP) Shopify logo

  • Price: $1487.47 (as of close Oct 19, 2021)
  • Revenue Growth: 85.25%

This one isn’t as much of a long-time, steady-growth giant as some of the others on the list. With that comes a bit more risk than with Apple or Amazon or Microsoft. But, in investing, you find that greater risk often leads to greater reward. We’ll see.

Shopify lets merchants of all sizes do business online. With Shopify’s help, any company can create an ecommerce site and use their tools to handle all the back-office tasks, from driving sales to tracking customers to managing day-to-day operations.

Even before the pandemic made in-person shopping a challenge, we were moving quickly toward a retail world increasingly dominated by e-commerce. Shopify is helping to make that happen and investors who saw that trend and jumped on board have done very well of late. The share price is now over $1,300, so you might need to go with fractional shares to jump in, but I think the climb will continue.

13. Spotify (NYSE: SPOT) Spotify logo

  • Price: $251.18 (as of close Oct 20, 2021)
  • Revenue Growth: 17.72%

Spotify’s stock price absolutely jammed out earlier this year thanks to partnerships with Kim Kardashian West and Joe Rogan. Pundits think these celebrity endorsements help the streaming music company stand out from its competition and that, over time, the company will gain market share. At last count, Spotify had more than 165 million paid subscribers and more than 365 million active users on the platform.

The stock has fallen off those highs from earlier this year, but the company continues to make good decisions. Its exclusive Michelle Obama podcast was among the most popular podcasts in the world last year, and Spotify keeps finding new audiences and new ways to make money on their services. It’s a bit riskier than some of the other suggestions here, but it might be worth an investment if you believe in the future of podcasts. Just my two cents!

14. Teladoc Health (NYSE: TDOC) Teladoc Health logo

  • Price: $140.48 (as of close Oct 20, 2021)
  • Revenue Growth: 127.42%

Here’s one you might not have heard of, especially if you don’t spend a lot of time with your doctor. Teladoc Health works to keep people out of the doctor’s office, a trend that was picking up steam even before the pandemic. They provide a platform for healthcare customers to meet with their doctors via video-conference (aka, tele-health).

Teladoc saw its virtual visits this year more than triple over the previous year, thanks largely to the pandemic. But I don’t think that’s a trend that’s going away as soon as it’s safe to leave your house again. Many people are finding out you can take care of many of your medical needs from your own home, so why go back to the doctor’s office if you don’t have to?

Teladoc’s share price rose significantly during the pandemic stock frenzy—hitting highs around $290—but has since come down to $130 at the time of this writing. Whatever the price, I think Teladoc is still a well-positioned player in a growing field, so it’s worth a good look.

15. Tesla (NASDAQ: TSLA) Tesla logo

  • Price: $865.8 (as of close Oct 19, 2021)
  • Revenue Growth: 62.84%

Tesla is one of my favorite stocks. Not only because I’ve made a ton of money with it, but because I’m such a huge fan of the company’s innovative technology and potential for future digital disruption.

If you’re a firm believer that electric cars are the future of automotive transit, and you’re a fan of Elon Musk’s bold visions, Tesla could be a solid addition to your portfolio. Keep in mind that Tesla isn’t just cars, either. The company is also focused on disrupting the battery sector and purchased SolarCity a few years ago.

Like Apple, Tesla performed a stock split this year, and shares are now more than $780 each. Some (including Elon Musk) might say that the share price is overvalued. But I think we’re still in the early stages of what Tesla might eventually mean to the world… and to its investors.

Pick Like A Pro

Where to invest $500 right now

Before you buy Amazon, or Netflix, or Apple, consider this…

The team at Motley Fool first recommended each of those stocks more than a dozen years ago!

  • They discovered Netflix for $1.85 per share, back in the days of DVDs by mail.
  • And recommended Amazon at $15.31 in 2002, before most people were comfortable using credit cards online.
  • And even hit Apple at $4.97 per share, about a month before the release of the very first iPhone.

Check out where those stocks are today. The bottom line: a $500 investment in all three of these stocks would be worth more than $200,000 today!

And here’s why that’s important: The Motley Fool’s flagship investing service Stock Advisor just announced their top 10 “best buys now” across the entire stock market. Whether you’re starting with $100, $500, or more, you’ll want to get the full details!

Click here to learn more

Change Your Life

From $2.26 to Millionaire in 5 Years

Hey, Grant here. I founded Millennial Money after going from $2.26 in my bank account to over a million in just five years.

Over 80% of my net worth was generated from the growth of my stock investments, many of which I made on my phone!

But how do you get started investing? Which brokerage should you use? What account type is best for you? What should you invest in?

Enter your email address now to enroll in a free, 5-day email course: “How to start investing in stocks: A no-bullshit, jargon-free guide”.

By submitting your email address, you consent to us keeping you informed about updates to our website and about other products and services that we think might interest you. You can unsubscribe at any time. Please read our Privacy Statement and Terms & Conditions.

Thanks! Please check your email in a few minutes. See you soon.

Summary: Best Stocks To Buy For Beginners

To recap, below are the top 15 stocks that beginners can’t go wrong investing in for the long-term:

Name Symbol Price
(as of close October 20, 2021)
Market Cap Revenue Growth
Amazon logo Amazon NASDAQ:AMZN $3415.06 $1.744T 37.76%
Alphabet logo Alphabet NASDAQ:GOOG $2848.3 $1.914T 32.67%
Apple logo Apple NASDAQ:AAPL $149.26 $2.459T 26.77%
Costco logo Costco NASDAQ:COST $469.77 $207.556B 17.49%
Disney logo Disney NYSE:DIS $170.55 $311.056B -8.89%
Facebook logo Facebook NASDAQ:FB $340.78 $958.583B 39.43%
Mastercard logo Mastercard NYSE:MA $356.77 $357.311B 2.56%
Microsoft logo Microsoft NASDAQ:MSFT $307.41 $2.308T 17.53%
Netflix logo Netflix NASDAQ:NFLX $625.14 $276.684B 20.21%
Nike logo Nike NYSE:NKE $158.45 $250.797B 23.72%
Pinterest logo Pinterest NYSE:PINS $62.68 $40.405B 83.55%
Shopify logo Shopify NYSE:SHOP $1487.47 $185.921B 85.25%
Spotify logo Spotify NYSE:SPOT $251.18 $48.065B 17.72%
Teladoc logo Teladoc NYSE:TDOC $140.48 $22.371B 127.42%
Tesla logo Tesla NASDAQ:TSLA $865.8 $855.64B 62.84%

The Best Stocks to Buy in Fall 

As we entered fall 2021, more and more people across America got vaccinated against COVID-19 and the “reopening” began. So far this year, that’s meant incredible gains for industries that were passed over in 2020, such as energy and consumer goods stocks.

Just take a peek at the table below that highlights a few of the S&P 500’s biggest winners so far this year. Stocks that have been sold off in recent years (The Gap, Ford Motor) are suddenly back in favor.

Stock Return in 2021
Marathon Oil (NYSE: MRO) 101.7%
Nucor (NYSE: NUE)  79.9%
Ford Motor Company (NYSE: F) 69.6%
The Gap (NYSE: GPS) 59.9%
Data compliments of S&P CapitalIQ. As of June 22, 2021.

One thing stocks on this list have in common? They’re value stocks, which is to say their growth isn’t as impressive as most stocks you’ll find on this list, but they were trading at cheap multiples (that is to say, low price-to-earnings ratios) headed into this year. 

Which stocks are best for beginners?

Contrarily, many growth stocks saw aggressive sell-offs between February and May. As we enter the fall, many of these growth stocks have bounced back, but if your portfolio has become overly allocated to stocks with plenty of growth in the future priced in (such as Tesla, Pinterest, and Teladoc from the list above), you could consider adding the following companies that not only benefit from the economic “reopening,” but are also priced closer to “value stocks” that have been outperforming so far in 2021. 

  • Disney: It’s not just Disney’s parks that will benefit from a reopening world, but the company will also see tailwinds from the return of cruise ships and blockbuster movies in theaters.
  • Costco: In the past year, Costco has grown sales by 13% while profits grew 15% in spite of the pandemic. With bricks and mortar competitors closing, Costco faces declining competition. In addition, Costco saw its online sales jump 50% in fiscal 2020. Even after the pandemic abates, the improvements Costco has made to its ecommerce operation should have continuing benefits.
  • Mastercard: While most ecommerce shopping uses credit cards, the resumption of spending verticals like travel should provide tailwinds for Mastercard (and rivals like Visa) in the years ahead.

Stock Market Investing Tips for Beginners

1. Invest in Companies That You Understand

This might sound like common sense. But I’ve seen too many people invest in stocks (and therefore, in companies) purely based on advice from a friend, something they heard on the news, or even a mere whim. All too often, I’ve heard the horror stories of stocks losing massive amounts of value in a short time, making shares virtually worthless.

To avoid that fate, I only recommend investing in companies that are easy to understand and that have a proven track record.

For example, let’s say you like Apple (AAPL) or Amazon (AMZN). Either would be a relatively straightforward investment. You’re buying shares of a mature business whose services you probably use—and whose values are consistently increasing over time.

2. Don’t Time the Market

According to the Oracle of Omaha, Warren Buffett, “trying to time the market” is the number one mistake that new investors make. That means don’t try to buy a stock when you think the price is low— it could dip even lower the very next day.

Instead, purchase a stock of a company that is likely to increase in value over time, regardless of what you might be hearing about the company in the news or from friends.

3. Avoid Penny Stocks

If a deal seems too good to be true, it probably is.

Such is the case with pretty much all penny stocks, which is why I don’t recommend them. Generally speaking, companies that are available on penny stock exchanges are not as well-positioned for growth and, therefore, can’t provide competitive returns over time.

4. Consider Buying Fractional Shares

The high prices of many blue chip stocks are a common barrier to first-time investors. For example, if you only have a few hundred bucks saved, you can’t buy even one share of Alphabet (GOOG), which now sits higher than $2,700, or Amazon (AMZN), which is currently over $3,000!

If this sounds like your situation, where you don’t have a ton of money saved but would still like to get your hands on some prime blue-chip stocks, you’re in luck.

Companies Offering Fractional Shares:

For as little as $5, you can get a slice of a blue-chip stock. These fractional shares can build up over time or sold like a normal stock.

Eventually, you might even be able to piece together several whole shares of stock by sticking to the course and buying fractional shares on a regular basis.

Learn More:

5. Stay the Course

If you want to be successful in the stock market, you cannot respond emotionally to market shifts or trending news topics. Stock investing is a long game. The only way to really see a return is to experience compounded growth, which builds up over years, as you continue to invest your money in certain funds.

Even seasoned investors like myself fall for the same trap of selling stocks when worried that those funds might sharply decline—due to a pandemic, for example. Unfortunately, we find out the hard way a few months later that those stocks that were sold potentially at a loss are now worth even more.

Staying the course also means being disciplined with buying shares over time. Find an investment schedule that works for you—for example, buying new shares on a monthly or quarterly basis—and stick to it.

If you only buy a handful of shares once, your earning potential will be far lower than if you purchase hundreds or even thousands of shares of that same stock over several years.

Additional Investing Resources:

Picking the Best Starting Portfolio for You

When you buy a share of stock, you’re literally buying a piece of that company. If you’re still unsure of where to start, I recommend doing some soul searching and devising a game plan before jumping in.

Are there any companies on the above list with values, products, and services you agree with? What about other companies not on this list? Who do you think will be even bigger 30 years down the line when it’s time to cash in your retirement chips?

Once you identify a few companies that fit your criteria and risk tolerance, the next step is purchasing shares in your brokerage account.

By following the tips outlined above and investing in any of the above stocks, chances are you will be happy you did. Here’s to finding the right stocks for you so your money can grow for you while you’re living your best life!

John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Suzanne Frey, an executive at Alphabet, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Teresa Kersten, an employee of LinkedIn, a Microsoft subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Randi Zuckerberg, a former director of market development and spokeswoman for Facebook and sister to its CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, is a member of The Motley Fool's board of directors. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Alphabet (A shares), Alphabet (C shares), Amazon, Apple, Costco Wholesale, Facebook, Mastercard, Microsoft, Netflix, Nike, Pinterest, Shopify, Spotify Technology, Teladoc Health, Tesla, and Walt Disney. The Motley Fool recommends the following options: long January 2022 $1,920 calls on Amazon, long January 2023 $1,140 calls on Shopify, long March 2023 $120 calls on Apple, short January 2022 $1,940 calls on Amazon, short January 2023 $1,160 calls on Shopify, and short March 2023 $130 calls on Apple. Millennial Money is part of The Motley Fool network. Millennial Money has a disclosure policy.

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